TOWN & COUNTRY TOUR OF HOMES BOASTS NINE MUST-SEE PROPERTIES

Annual Event Acts as Important Fundraiser, Educational Tool for Heritage Foundation

FRANKLIN, Tenn. – In early June, local residents open their doors to host the Town & Country Tour of Homes—a fundraiser for the non-profit Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County that underscores the importance of historic preservation. This year’s 38th annual event, to be held June 1 and 2, includes nine properties that encompass the community’s dedication to protecting the architectural and cultural resources of the surrounding area. Tickets are available through www.HistoricFranklin.com or by calling 615.591.8500, Ext. 18.

The homes and businesses on this year’s tour will showcase architectural styles of the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as modern interpretations of Federal, Victorian and French Country-style homes in a newer neighborhood. Heritage Foundation Membership and Development Director Kristy Williams says that while everyone loves the historic homes, the new builds are always a welcome and eye-opening aspect to the tour.

“Most of our featured properties have either been exceptionally preserved or rehabilitated,” said Williams, who coordinates the event. “But we’re also featuring three contemporary homes, an always-fun addition to the tour.

“It’s a valuable component for the Heritage Foundation, because it gives homeowners a tangible look at how a new build can respect its geographical heritage. It really serves as an educational tool for the organization.”

Each of the modern homes is located in Westhaven, a community that was purposefully designed to mimic the character and charm of downtown Franklin. The trio offers a bevy of warm interior design ideas that complement the differing architectural styles.

The six additional properties on the tour represent both the “town” and “country” parts of the tour, from the historic village of Leiper’s Fork to homes just off of Franklin’s Public Square. Tour destinations include:

• The ca. 1849 Pleasant View Farm—better known locally as Gentry Farm—in the countryside on Highway 96 West has been in the same family since 1849. The farm encompasses nearly 400 acres, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

• In addition to the 1869 home place, the early 1800s Gentry’s Farm Log Cabin on the farm will be open to the public. The historic property was moved from an area near Goodlettsville, Tenn., 25 years ago; each log was numbered and reconstructed exactly as found. The structure was originally built nearly 200 years ago and is a double-pen, one-and-half-story log home with a dogtrot typical to early Middle Tennessee log homes.

• The early 1900s Leiper’s Fork Inn, just down the road from the Westhaven community. Two 100-year-old cottages were rescued and moved to the Leiper’s Fork village, and combined to create a bed-and-breakfast that celebrates the structure’s architectural heritage.

• A ca. 1910 Southern Colonial Revival home on 2nd Avenue South, today home to company Outdoor Classic Structures, a design-build firm with a studio that focuses on non-climatized areas and outdoor construction. The quaint corner cottage features stunning gardens surrounding this tiny treasure and is a contributing property to downtown Franklin’s National Register District.

• The Historic Reynolds Bungalow, built in 1915, on South Margin Street originally served as a boarding house for Battle Ground Academy students. The modified craftsman home was completely restored as a LEED-certified, environmentally sustainable home.

• Ty’s House, the unique Second Empire-style residential structure on Mt. Hope Street, was recently renovated to preserve the ca. 1905 home. The Mount Hope Perpetual Care Association (the adjacent cemetery’s non-profit organization) and Hard Bargain Association (HBA) took great care to save the fish-scale gable detailing and extensively rehabilitated the property, which now serves as a community center and office for HBA.

• In Westhaven, Paul Huff of Stonegate Homes constructed a French Country-style home that lends a casual cottage feel. Just around the corner in the neighborhood, participants will walk through a two-story Federal-style home, representative of the stately simplicity found in the earliest home still standing in Downtown Franklin. While still in Westhaven, the public will get a look into a Victorian Italianate-style home on Stonewater Boulevard. This popular version of Victorian-era architecture is also seen throughout the Historic Downtown Franklin commercial district.

Downtown Franklin resident Marti Veto is the chair of the 38th Annual Town & Country Tour of Homes, presented by Bob Parks Realty. Tickets are $30 each before the tour, and $35 on the days of the tour. Tickets may be purchased at any of the sites during the tour, online at www.historicfranklin.com or by calling Williams at (615) 591-8500 x18.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

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Longtime Williamson County Residents Open Their Historical Homes This Weekend

Gentry's Farm Log Home at 1974 New Highway 96 WestFor 200 years, the Gentry family has farmed the Williamson County soil and contributed to the geographical resources of the community. This Saturday and Sunday, the longtime local residents will continue their legacy of cultural preservation: the family is opening up two of their historic homes for the 38th Annual Town & Country Tour of Homes, benefiting the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County.

The ca. 1849 Pleasant View Farm—better known locally as Gentry Farm—in the countryside on Highway 96 West has been in the family since 1849. The property encompasses nearly 400 acres, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Cindy and Allen Gentry say they wanted to throw open their doors to the public to further the Heritage Foundation’s effort to educate the community on its rich history.

“I enjoy watching people appreciate history. By doing this, it is allowing people to appreciate and respect local history,” Cindy Gentry said. “I’ve never been one for dates and facts, but have always loved the stories and seeing how things were once done. This type of experience helps people feel like they are part of the past.”

The first building that participants will tour on the Gentry property is a ca. 1869 home, built by Allen Gentry’s great-great grandfather Samuel Fielding Glass.  On the tour, guests will hear about the antique structure, how it was constructed, and the many generations who have lived in it over the years.

Cindy Gentry said that one of the artifacts on display will be a stone mason’s receipt to Glass, dating back to 1861. The paper states it will postpone laying the home’s foundation until the country’s internal conflict is resolved. The receipt date shows it was written 12 days after the Battle of Fort Sumter.

“The receipt said, in effect, ‘we will return and complete out work after the current political rest,’” Cindy said. “Well, the foundation sat for about seven years. Receipts we have show that building didn’t resume until the Civil War ended.”

Gentry's Farm Main House at 1970 New Highway 96 WestIn addition to the historical “Main House,” the early 1800s Gentry’s Farm Log Cabin will also be open. The structure was moved from an area near Goodlettsville, Tenn., 25 years ago, and in the process each log was numbered and reconstructed exactly as found.

The frame was originally built nearly 200 years ago and is a double-pen, one-and-half-story log home with a dogtrot typical to early Middle Tennessee log homes. Cindy says that guests will get a similar experience on this property as the “Main House”—an interior bursting with family heirlooms and antiques collected over the past century, in addition to personal, modern-day touches.

“I think people will enjoy seeing the Main House, and seeing the great variety of heirlooms our ancestors have collected over the years. Each has a very interesting story, and guests will get to hear some of those along with the story behind the home,” she said. “Our house [the log cabin] is a bit different. It’s very historic, but we’ve decorated to blend both my husband’s and my family’s pieces. It’s still fun, but a little less formal.”

In addition to the two homes, the tour circuit will show participants the Gentry Farm crop land, which Allen farms today. Cindy says the public will also be able to walk out to the family’s cemetery, where several generations are buried.

Downtown Franklin resident Marti Veto is the chair of the Tour of Homes, presented by Bob Parks Realty. Tickets are $30 each before the tour, and $35 on the days of the tour. Tickets may be purchased at any of the sites during the tour, online at www.historicfranklin.com or by calling Kristy Williams at (615) 591-8500 x18.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.


Historic Homes Open to the Public

Six historic homes in and around Franklin will be open to the public during the annual Tour of Homes, June 1 and 2.  Produced by The Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County, the annual tour showcases historic properties as a way of highlighting the benefits of historic preservation. In addition to the six historic properties, three contemporary homes also will be available for viewing by the public.

Tickets for the tour are available for $30 in advance of the tour or for $35 on the day of the tour.  Tickets can be purchased by clicking here or by calling Kristy Williams at 615-591-8500, ext. 18.

For more information on the homes on tour, click here.


TOWN & COUNTRY TOUR OF HOMES BOASTS NINE MUST-SEE PROPERTIES

Ty's HouseIn early June, local residents open their doors to host the Town & Country Tour of Homes—a fundraiser for the non-profit Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County that underscores the importance of historic preservation. This year’s 38th annual event, to be held June 1 and 2, includes nine properties that encompass the community’s dedication to protecting the architectural and cultural resources of the surrounding area.  Tickets are available through www.HistoricFranklin.com or by calling 615.591.8500, Ext. 18.

The homes and businesses on this year’s tour will showcase architectural styles of the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as modern interpretations of Federal, Victorian and French Country-style homes in a newer neighborhood. Heritage Foundation Membership and Development Director Kristy Williams says that while everyone loves the historic homes, the new builds are always a welcome and eye-opening aspect to the tour.

“Most of our featured properties have either been exceptionally preserved or rehabilitated,” said Williams, who coordinates the event. “But we’re also featuring three contemporary homes, an always-fun addition to the tour.

“It’s a valuable component for the Heritage Foundation, because it gives homeowners a tangible look at how a new build can respect its geographical heritage. It really serves as an educational tool for the organization.”

Each of the modern homes is located in Westhaven, a community that was purposefully designed to mimic the character and charm of downtown Franklin. The trio offers a bevy of warm interior design ideas that complement the differing architectural styles.

The six additional properties on the tour represent both the “town” and “country” parts of the tour, from the historic village of Leiper’s Fork to homes just off of Franklin’s Public Square. Tour destinations include:

 

  • The ca. 1849 Pleasant View Farm—better known locally as Gentry Farm—in the countryside on Highway 96 West has been in the same family since 1849. The farm encompasses nearly 400 acres, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • In addition to the 1869 home place, the early 1800s Gentry’s Farm Log Cabin on the farm will be open to the public. The historic property was moved from an area near Goodlettsville, Tenn., 25 years ago; each log was numbered and reconstructed exactly as found. The structure was originally built nearly 200 years ago and is a double-pen, one-and-half-story log home with a dogtrot typical to early Middle Tennessee log homes.
  • The early 1900s Leiper’s Fork Inn, just down the road from the Westhaven community. Two 100-year-old cottages were rescued and moved to the Leiper’s Fork village, and combined to create a bed-and-breakfast that celebrates the structure’s architectural heritage.
  • A ca. 1910 Southern Colonial Revival home on 2nd Avenue South, today home to company Outdoor Classic Structures, a design-build firm with a studio that focuses on non-climatized areas and outdoor construction. The quaint corner cottage features stunning gardens surrounding this tiny treasure and is a contributing property to downtown Franklin’s National Register District.
  • The Historic Reynolds Bungalow, built in 1915, on South Margin Street originally served as a boarding house for Battle Ground Academy students. The modified craftsman home was completely restored as a LEED-certified, environmentally sustainable home.
  • Ty’s House, the unique Second Empire-style residential structure on Mt. Hope Street, was recently renovated to preserve the ca. 1905 home. The Mount Hope Perpetual Care Association (the adjacent cemetery’s non-profit organization) and Hard Bargain Association (HBA) took great care to save the fish-scale gable detailing and extensively rehabilitated the property, which now serves as a community center and office for HBA.
  • In Westhaven, Paul Huff of Stonegate Homes constructed a French Country-style home that lends a casual cottage feel. Just around the corner in the neighborhood, participants will walk through a two-story Federal-style home, representative of the stately simplicity found in the earliest home still standing in Downtown Franklin. While still in Westhaven, the public will get a look into a Victorian Italianate-style home on Stonewater Boulevard. This popular version of Victorian-era architecture is also seen throughout the Historic Downtown Franklin commercial district.

Downtown Franklin resident Marti Veto is the chair of the 38th Annual Town & Country Tour of Homes, presented by Bob Parks Realty. Tickets are $30 each before the tour, and $35 on the days of the tour. Tickets may be purchased at any of the sites during the tour, online at www.historicfranklin.com or by calling Williams at (615) 591-8500 x18.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.


Hincheyville’s Marti Veto Named Chair of 38th Annual Tour of Homes

Downtown Franklin resident Marti Veto has been named chair of the 38th Annual Town & Country Tour of Homes, to be held June 1 and 2 in and around historic Franklin.

The event, produced by the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County, is designed to showcase old homes in an effort to underscore the importance of historic preservation. This year’s tour includes properties from the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as modern interpretations of Federal, Victorian and French Country-style homes in a newer neighborhood.

Veto, who bought her ca. 1920 Craftsman-style bungalow in 2007 on West Main Street, opened her restored home to the Tour of Homes in 2008.

“I love my downtown neighborhood—the history each house represents, the stories shared about previous owners, and most of all the ability to walk down the street and be in the heart of a bustling but well-preserved community,” Veto said. “The Heritage Foundation is one of the reasons it’s been so successful, and this tour is a deep-seated tradition.”

A native of Somerset, Ky., Veto came to Franklin from San Francisco, where she worked in the biotech industry. In 2009, she was tapped to lead the Cool Springs Chamber of Commerce, cultivating the organization to a point where it was happy to be absorbed into the newly unified Williamson County Chamber of Commerce. Most recently, she has launched Marti Veto Strategic Communications, a marketing consultancy.

“In my years of promoting life-saving biotech medicines, I won a lot of awards,” she says. “Now I just want to be a catalyst for others to reach their performance goals.”

The Tour includes the ca. 1849 Pleasant View Farm—better known locally as Gentry Farm—in the countryside on Highway 96 West. Both the 1869 home place and an early 1800s log cabin on the farm will be open to the public. Across the street in the Westhaven neighborhood, three contemporary homes that nod to local history will be part of the tour.

Also participating is the early 1900s Leiper’s Fork Inn on Old Hillsboro Road; a ca. 1910 Southern Colonial Revival home and garden on 2nd Avenue South and the Historic Reynolds Bungalow, built in 1915, on South Margin Street in downtown Franklin; and Ty’s House, the recently renovated ca. 1905 Second Empire-style home on Mt. Hope Street that now serves as the headquarters of the Hard Bargain Association.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.historicfranklin.com or call Kristy Williams at (615) 591-8500 x18.


Heritage Ball to Celebrate 40 Years of Preservation Success

40th Annual Heritage BallFrom Roper’s Knob to the Franklin Theatre, and a long list of historic treasures saved in between, the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County has a lot to celebrate. The 40th Annual Heritage Ball, to be held Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin, will be a retrospective on all that has been accomplished over the course of nearly a half century.

The Foundation’s work could not be done without its members and supporters, including corporate sponsors who underwrite significant expenses for key fundraising events. FirstBank has agreed to serve again as presenting sponsor for the Heritage Ball, underscoring their commitment to the community and the Heritage Foundation’s mission.

“FirstBank is making a big investment in downtown Franklin because we believe in the value of our history, and the Heritage Foundation has been the driving force behind preserving and enhancing our historic treasures,” said Gordon Inman, FirstBank’s Chairman – Middle Tennessee. “We’re excited about the restoration of the Historic Five Points Post Office, and about working with the Heritage Foundation on other projects moving forward. The Ball is a wonderful way to celebrate 40 years of success and to raise funds toward the future, and we are delighted to be a part of it.”

Jan and Andy Marshall, long-time Williamson County residents who own and operate the very popular Puckett’s family of restaurants, have been named the 2013 Ball chairs.

Andy took the path of his father’s grocery store business, purchasing his first Piggly Wiggly store at the age of 26, and eventually owned several stores in the area. He was president of the Tennessee Grocers Association, but his love of food, music and community began to steer him in a different direction in the mid-‘90s.  In 1998, he opened Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant in Leiper’s Fork, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Today, the Marshalls own Puckett’s restaurants in downtown Franklin, downtown Nashville and downtown Columbia. Puckett’s Boat House in downtown Franklin opened last year, and the Marshalls are part owners in Gray’s on Main, set to open this spring on historic Franklin’s Main Street. The restaurants have won multiple awards for best barbecue, meat and three, service, music and more.

Through the first decade of Puckett’s growth, Jan served as the company’s marketing and public relations arm. Previously, she was a director of admissions at Franklin Road Academy. She continues to play a central role in the development of the Puckett’s family of restaurants. The Marshalls have been married for 26 years, and have three adult children, Claire, Emily and Cliff. Their first grandchild is due this summer.

“We’ve always been proud to be associated with the Heritage Foundation, and it is a true honor to be asked to serve as chairs of the Heritage Ball,” Jan Marshall said. “We’re looking forward to working with the team to make the 40th Anniversary event one that will be remembered another half century from now.”

Angela Calhoun is returning as design chair, having produced a number of spectacular Balls over the last several years. She says the theme will reflect the landmark anniversary, with the color scheme associated with the traditional red that accompanies a 40-year commemoration.

“We are planning some special surprises throughout the evening that I think will make this one of the most memorable events ever,” Calhoun said.  “Every year, we try to build upon and top what has been done before, so our goal is to deliver an amazing experience that will dazzle all of the senses!”

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball benefit the work of the 46-year-old Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.  For more information on the Ball, and to learn more about the Heritage Foundation, visit www.historicfranklin.com or call Torrey Barnhill at (615) 591-8500, Ext. 20.


Sixteen Properties Honored in Heritage Foundation’s 46th Annual Meeting

Roberts-Moore House
Roberts-Moore House

The Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County commemorated nearly a decade of preservation work at their 46th Annual Meeting and Preservation Awards Thursday, May 2, 2013 at the Franklin Theatre.

Each May, the non-profit organization uses the evening to recap the past year’s accomplishments and celebrate outstanding historic preservation projects. The meeting also served as a platform to announce the official purchase agreement of the “old, old jail,” which the Heritage Foundation will restore to its ca. 1941 Art Deco appearance and use as office space.

Among the 2013 honorees were Franklin Mayor Ken Moore and his wife, Linda. The Roberts-Moore House on Third Avenue South was selected as the Overall Winner for the residential rehabilitation of the 19th century structure.

“This is a textbook example of historic rehabilitation, because both the exterior and interior included perfectly balanced modern additions,” said judge Dan Brown, a certified local government coordinator with the Tennessee Historical Commission. ”It is a perfect addition to Franklin’s historically rehabilitated architectural patrimony and a shining example of how to do historic preservation the right way.”

In addition to the Roberts-Moore House’s grand prize, the Heritage Foundation recognized 15 separate projects that exhibited historical deference, including rehabilitations of residential and commercial structures, and new construction that complements the historic character of the Williamson County community. Mary Ellen Stevens was included in the honors for placing a conservation easement with the Land Trust of Tennessee on Windsong Farm in Leiper’s Fork.

The following structures received recognition in the 2013 award ceremony:

  • Anthropologie (Award of Merit for Commercial Rehab)
  • Blakely House (Award of Merit for Sustainability)
  • Coffee House on Second & Bridge (Award of Merit for Adaptive Reuse)
  • Factory at Franklin (Award of Merit for Sustainability)
  • Franklin Battlefield Inn (Award of Merit for Sustainability)
  • Frothy Monkey (Award of Merit for Adaptive Reuse)
  • Jamison House (Award of Merit for Sustainability)
  • Mathis-Richards House (Award of Merit for Historic Renovation)
  • McCandless House (Award of Merit for Adaptive Reuse)
  • Ogilvie Place-Beech Hill Farm (Award of Merit for Historic Renovation)
  • Ty’s House (Award of Merit for Adaptive Reuse)
  • Windsong Farm (Conservation Land Easement)
  • 412 Eddy Lane (Award of Merit for Historic Renovation)
  • 901 Evans Street  (Award of Merit for New Design)
  • 911 Evans Street (Award of Merit for New Design)