42nd Annual Heritage Ball Offers Nonstop Action, Farm-to-Fork Bites

Harvest at Homestead

Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event is rapidly approaching, and organizers from the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County are making final preparations for the nearly sold-out 42nd Annual Heritage Ball on Saturday, Sept. 19 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

The estimated 700 attending guests will be treated to an impressive silent auction, cocktail hour, non-stop entertainment and a farm-to-fork dinner at the themed “Rhapsody in Blue” Ball.

“There are so many incredible components to this year’s event, and we’ve got some surprises in store, too,” said Lynne McAlister, Heritage Ball coordinator. “More than 650 people have bought tickets, so we’re nearly sold out. We encourage anyone planning to attend to purchase tickets now, before it’s too late – you won’t be able to wait after reading over the menu.”

The seated supper, provided by Harvest at Homestead Manor – also the presenting sponsor of the 2015 benefit – will focus on fresh delights, with many of the ingredients sourced from the restaurant’s on-site, organic farm. The dinner will be preceded by passed appetizers, which include fresh figs stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in prosciutto panini with fresh pear, cambozola cheese, arugula and prosciutto; and herb-whipped cream cheese with smoked salmon, caviar and chives on red endive.

The multi-course menu will include an assorted artisan bread basket with herb-whipped butter; a superfood salad with freshly picked vegetables and fruits from Homestead Manor’s farm; and locally sourced osso bucco atop corn brulee with swiss chard, a red wine reduction and micro greens.

Prior to dinner, during the cocktail hour, guests will be treated to the piano musings of Claire Cope. Following, Williamson County’s
​5​ Points Swing Band will serenade guests with the big band sounds of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Frank Sinatra.

Attendees will also enjoy a themed “Blue Note” cocktail during the hour created especially for the Ball by GRAY’S on Main.

After dinner, Al Paris & The Heartbreakers will get the crowd moving with on-stage charisma that shines in front of a live audience. After a decade touring globally as a member of Kool & The Gang, Al’s “renaissance man” career has lead him to work with high-profile artists and talented performers and studio musicians – many of which he has recruited into The Heartbreakers.

“The band and I can’t wait to get back to Franklin again, and we need a big crowd so the Heritage Foundation can preserve the Old, Old Jail,” said Paris. “We promise to leave it all on stage for you – you’ll have the night of your life – just be there for Heritage Ball and make sure you’ve got your dancin’ shoes on!”

For late-night bites, Puckett’s Trolley will be on hand to provide treats such as chicken and waffles and pulled pork cobblers.

To purchase tickets, contact McAlister at (615) 591-8500 or by email at lmcalister@historicfranklin.com.

This 2015 Heritage Ball will cast special spotlight on the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail, the Foundation’s first permanent headquarters and the community’s future Big House for Historic Preservation. All proceeds from the gala will be donated to the initiative.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

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Heritage Ball Casts Old Hollywood, Vintage Vision for 42nd Annual Gala

Now in its 42nd year, the Heritage Ball–the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williams County’s premiere annual fundraiser–is Williamson County’s longest-running black tie benefit and the social event of the season.

This year’s Ball will be held on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 and will cast special spotlight on the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail, the Foundation’s first permanent headquarters and the community’s future Big House for Historic Preservation.

Ball attendees can anticipate an unexpected look to the Heritage Ball, held each year at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

Inspiration for the gala, Design Chair Matt Logan says, originated from the classic 1951 film American in Paris and the classic 1924 George Gershwin song “Rhapsody in Blue,” – cultural bookends to the era of the Old, Old Jail, the beneficiary of 2015 Ball proceeds.

“What I love about historic preservation is that truly everything that is old, is new again,” Logan said. “We wanted to celebrate things past with a contemporary, creative approach.”

Logan, who is the artistic director of the celebrated theatre and production company Studio Tenn, says cool tones will accentuate the setting, with elements of gold throughout to warm the environment. Dark blue tablecloths will be highlighted by art deco-inspired china and set off by brass cutlery.

Blue light cast on the top of the tent, complemented by hung Edison and cafe bulbs, will play off the evening sky to add a whimsical element to the ambiance.

“We took ideas from Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ painting, and the magic of that. You’ll see that the design has a bit of period to it, but with overlying modern touches,” Logan said. “It will be very current.”

Predominantly white flower arrangements–overseen by Steve McLellan of Garden Delights–that include orchids, calla lilies, and roses will form sculptural designs, offering dramatic pockets throughout the Ball.

“Matt, Steve and Cathi [Aycock, Ball Chair] have dreamed up this rich design scheme that feels very Old Hollywood,” said Lynne McAlister, Heritage Ball coordinator. “I can promise that the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will truly be unlike any other year.”

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball support the non-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

To learn more about the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball, go here. To purchase a ticket, please contact Lynne McAlister at 615-591-8500.

Heritage Ball


Foundation Offers Public An Early Chance To Win 2015 Ball Auction Items, Impressive Spread

Generations of Williamson County residents have made a tradition of supporting the Heritage Ball, the black-tie event to be held September 19th that benefits the Heritage Foundation. This year the nonprofit’s patrons will have several once-in-a-lifetime opportunities, thanks to its 2015 silent auction offerings.

For the first time ever, the Foundation is opening online bids two weeks in advance: on Friday, Sept. 4, the public can take part in an impressive selection of items that range from estate jewels and custom clothing to extravagant getaways.

“We are both thrilled and thankful for our sponsors and volunteers who helped create one of the best silent auction spreads I have ever seen,” said Lynne McAlister, Heritage Ball coordinator. “These items range in value: you can visit a favorite restaurant or merchant, enjoy a weekend excursion, purchase a beautiful piece of art for yourself or as a gift…. there’s something for everyone this year.

“Plus each donation will play a helpful role in helping our organization not only preserve historical landmarks that may otherwise be destroyed, but also creating the Big House for Historic Preservation.”

Highlighted items include two commissioned paintings by world-renowned figurative artist Maestro Igor Babailov, who is currently completing the official portrait of Pope Francis; a luxurious Audi experience with a two-night stay in Sonoma, Calif.; two-day passes to the upcoming Pilgrimage Festival; a selection of breathtaking jewels from local jewelers; a six-night vacation in Mexico; gift cards from local merchants and restaurants; and more more.

Individuals can register to bid through the Foundation’s website here.

Last year, the silent auction proceeds raked in nearly $60,000 for the Foundation’s mission to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Williamson County.

This year’s monies will specifically benefit the renovation of the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail–also known as the future Big House for Historic Preservation, a public resource for historic preservation and the first permanent home for the Heritage Foundation.

The 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will be held September 19th at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Tickets are $375 per person, and tables are available. To learn more or reserve a ticket, go here or email Lynne McAlister at lmcalister@historicfranklin.com.


Igor Babailov, Deemed ‘Living Master,’ Offers Two Oil Portraits For Ball Auction

The Heritage Ball auction opened this particular item online for bids. To learn more about the portrait auction items, bidding process, and how it benefits the Foundation, go to the auction site at www.hfportraitauction.com.

Generations of Williamson County residents have made a tradition of supporting the Heritage Ball, the community’s longest-running black-tie event that benefits the Heritage Foundation. This year the nonprofit’s patrons will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, thanks to its 2015 silent auction offerings.

World-renowned figurative artist Maestro Igor Babailov, Hon. RAA, is providing two commissioned paintings for the Ball’s auction, one adult portrait (valued at $55,000) and another for a child (valued at $44,000). Babailov is currently completing the official portrait of Pope Francis–the artist’s third papal portrait–from his Brentwood-based studio.

40 - Babailov, Portrait of A  Lemire by Igor BabailovThanks to Babailov’s generosity, a Heritage Foundation supporter could be his next subject!

“Igor is a legend in the global artistic community, and those who benefit from his genius are part of an esteemed legacy that will live forever,” said Mary Pearce, executive director of the Heritage Foundation. “This is a priceless opportunity, and perhaps the most exciting silent auction we’ve ever had.  

“His donation will play a major role in helping the Foundation to preserve historical landmarks that may otherwise be destroyed. We are both thrilled and thankful.”

Deemed Living Master by his contemporaries, the Honorary Academician of the Russian Academy of Arts (est. 1757) is one of the most sought-after portrait artists in the world. He has been selected to paint three living presidents in three countries, two living Prime Ministers, members of the noble families and British Royalty, in addition to a slate of other prominent public figures. To learn more about his work, go to www.babailov.com.

Those who win the Babailov bids can expect a traditional portraiture process: the subject will sit for the artist for a few hours of preliminary graphite studies of likeness, character and personality. The following turnaround time for an oil portrait is three to six months. The individual 40 x 30” figure portraits come with  a personally endorsed copy of Babailov’s new book, “Greatest Portrait Moments.”

To reach a wider audience outside of Middle Tennessee, the Heritage Ball auction opened online this week for bids. To learn more about the portrait auction items, bidding process, and how it benefits the Heritage Foundation, go to the auction site at www.hfportraitauction.com.

Each year, the silent auction provides an impressive selection of items that range from estate jewels and custom clothing to extravagant getaways. Over the past two years silent auction proceeds have raked in more than $100,000 for the Foundation’s mission to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Williamson County.

This year’s monies will specifically benefit the renovation of the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail–also known as the future Big House for Historic Preservation, a public resource for historic preservation and the first permanent home for the Heritage Foundation.

The 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will be held September 19th at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Tickets are $375 per person, and tables are available. To learn more or reserve a ticket, go to www.historicfranklin.com/events or email Lynne McAlister at lmcalister@historicfranklin.com.

35 - Babailov, Portrait of Leah by Igor Babailov

42ND Annual Heritage Ball Theme Revealed Among Vintage Revelry

 

More than 250 guests gathered around an impressive vintage car collection at Alexander Automotive on Friday, July 31 for a glamorous evening celebrating the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball–and the reveal of this year’s “Rhapsody in Blue​” theme, inspired by the classic Georgia Gershwin song.

​”​One of the most widely performed versions of the song was the first classical arrangement, often dubbed the 1941 Rhapsody​,” said Lynne McAlister, Heritage Ball coordinator.​ “Since the monies raised at the ​benefit this year will go toward renovating the ca. 1941 Old, Old, Jail​, we felt the theme had a lovely synergy with the mission of the Ball.​”​

Supporters of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County enjoyed a mini silent auction, craft cocktails by GRAY’S on Main, and Premier DJs of Nashville spinning tunes in a magnificent setting complements of Barry and Jackie Alexander’s antique cars. Plus, guests enjoyed farm-to-fork bites created by Homestead Manor that included herbed ​g​oat ​cheese in ​p​hyllo ​c​igars​,​ rye squares with ​s​moked ​b​eets, ​m​icro ​g​reens and ​ca​nnellini ​b​ean​s, sweet potato biscuits with blackberry jam, caramelized onions and beef tenderloin, and more.​

In addition ​​models acted as docents for the evening. Elizabeth Greer, Taylor McGrath and Erica Wagstaff–wearing​ themed designs​ ​provided ​exclusively ​by​ Belk at Cool Springs Galleria–shar​ed ​history about several different cars, ​the 42nd Heritage Ball ​and the Heritage Foundation’s vision for the “Big House for Historic Preservation” (or the Old, Old Jail).

In the past, the reveal party has been a more quiet affair, but thanks to the vision cast by Ball Chair Cathi Aycock, this season’s reveal night became a “party about a party.”

“I wanted to keep all of the wonderful things that make the Heritage Ball so beloved, ​and ​combine that with some ​more modern elements to really thank our volunteers and make this night shine​,” Aycock says. “​I hope to use the same formula​–keep the best and add something fresh–to the Ball itself too. I think if someone hasn’t been to the ​event in a while, they will be amazed at what we have planned. And ​I know the loyal Ball attendees will love the mix of classic and ​fresh ​ideas​​.​”​

The 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will be held September 19 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. To purchase tickets or learn more, go here or ​email Lynne McAlister at lmcalister@historicfranklin.com.

Heritage Ball

Cathi and Coleman Aycock Cast Vision for Heritage Ball, September 19th

Cathi and Coleman Aycock

Much about the Heritage Ball has changed over the last four decades, but the mission of the seasoned tradition remains the same. Members of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County are every bit as focused on the importance of historic preservation here as they were in 1972.

This year, Coleman and Cathi Aycock of Franklin have been chosen to cast their vision and lead planning for Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event, to be held Saturday, Sept. 19th, 2015.

“We are honored to continue the Ball legacy that the ones who came before us brought to life,” Cathi Aycock said. “Living in Franklin for the past 26 years has given our family a greater appreciation for what this event represents. Franklin is a place that values, protects and preserves our cultural resources — but if it weren’t for the Heritage Foundation’s work, our community would not be the same shining jewel it is today.”

Coleman Aycock has been a commercial real estate broker for 30 years, currently specializing in Williamson County property with Urban Grout Commercial Real Estate. He has served as past president of SIOR for Middle and East Tennessee. Coleman is a past board member of the Brentwood Chamber of Commerce, former chairman of the advisory council for The Salvation Army, served on the board of the Williamson County Transportation Association and was a past ambassador on the Diversity Council.

Born and raised in Middle Tennessee, Cathi Aycock was a stay-at-home mom for several years before returning to the workplace to create a popular lifestyle brand as part of her role as the style columnist at The Tennessean.

Now, she acts as the director of marketing and communications at Homestead Manor in Thompson’s Station — A. Marshall Family Foods Inc.’s latest multi-layer hospitality concept that includes Harvest, a rustic Tuscany-inspired restaurant and bar slated to open in June. In addition, the Homestead property will house an on-site organic farm and orchard, a rustic event barn, a farmer’s market and more.

In recent years, Cathi has worked with organizations such as Mercy Community Healthcare, Friends of Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, Second Harvest Food Bank and Habitat for Humanity, and has volunteered in support of various events for the Heritage Foundation.

Together, the Aycocks have two children, Cole (21) and Claire (19), both of whom attend the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

“When we moved to Williamson County on our first wedding anniversary, we planned on staying a year or so, then moving on back to Nashville,” Cathi said. “But we fell in love with the people and the sense of place here. Fast forward over two decades, and we now hope to celebrate every wedding anniversary, through our 50th and beyond, in this amazing community.”

Though she brings many years of experience in marketing and event production to the table, Cathi says she really hopes to draw on her own first experience at the Heritage Ball for inspiration on the event she’s now chairing, two decades later.

“Coleman and I attended as young newlyweds, me in a borrowed gown. I fell in love with the glamour of the event and the people who were so passionate about the Foundation’s vision,” she said. “I hope to recreate that magical feeling within guests at the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball, with newly conceived ideas and modern touches.”

The 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will be held September 19th at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. To pre-purchase tickets or learn more, email Lynne McAlister at lmcalister@historicfranklin.com.


People Who Make An Impact: Meet Lynne McAlister (Q+A)

Lynne McAlisterAs the newest member of the Heritage Foundation team, Lynne McAlister is a “born and bred” Franklinite who recently moved back from London–and currently lives in Historic Downtown Franklin.

She’ll be heading up the Special Events here at the Foundation–which includes the Heritage Ball, the community’s longest-running black tie event. Below, we’ve put together a short Q&A, so that you can get to know Lynne a bit better!

Q: Tell us a little about what you’re doing for the Heritage Foundation?

A:  I’m planning the Heritage Ball, which means I am meeting generous sponsors and gathering loads of talented, enthusiastic and creative people. Together we’re imagining a beautiful and profitable night to remember.

Q: Why did you want to work with the Foundation?

A: It’s an absolute thrill to see the way that visionaries and the Heritage Foundation have worked to keep the best of the past and simultaneously nurturing a vibrant future. I want to be a part of that!

Q: What is your favorite part about the job, so far? 

A: Meeting so many people that love Franklin and Williamson County as much as I do.

Q: We hear you were an “ex-pat” for a while. Where were you, and why? 

A: My husband, Tony, and I have lived in London twice for a total of about 10 years. We moved back home last year. Why did we live there? The real answer is that we lived there because we adored it. Though it was his career that afforded us that opportunity, most corporate ex-pats make the move because they are looking for a safe adventure. That was true for us too.

Q: Did you enjoy the experience? 

A:  Oh yeah! It was an absolute delight! I loved making dear friends with people that come from varied backgrounds. I treasured the people, the culture, the parks, the diversity of a world city, the museums, the theatre, the architecture, the restaurants, especially the restaurants.

Q: What is one take-away from living abroad for several years? 

A:  Well I know I’m preaching to the choir here, but, living in a city that dates from pre-Roman times and traveling extensively through Europe lighted a passion for “saving the places that matter”.

It dawned on me one day that it’s up to all of us to be preservationist when I was wandering through Hampstead, a fetching little village just north of London, and spoke with a lady who was sweeping the stoop of her 17th century terraced house. I commented on how beautiful her home was. She said, “We are so happy that we get to be a part of this house’s life. Its story began long before us and will continue after we’re gone. I’m grateful I get to take care of it for a little while.” Yeah – what she said!

Q: We know you were involved with non-profits in London. Talk to us about that… 

A:  Indeed.  I was the President of the American Women’s Club of London.  This is a 116-year-old, very active organization (35-40 activities a month) of approximately 400 expat women.  It’s both social and philanthropic.   I also served on the board for the Federation of International Women’s Association of London which attempts to build bridges among various cultures by working together on humanitarian projects.  Lastly, I was involved with Federation of Women’s Clubs Overseas which lobbies Congress on behalf of expats.

Q: What’s your favorite thing about Franklin/Williamson County?

A:  I love that we having rolling hills with robust farms and an enviable downtown.  I love all the fresh array of friendly new faces that have sought Franklin out as a place to build their lives.  And I love that there are still folks around that knew my parents since they were kids.

Q: If you were stranded on a desert island, what are four things you’d have to take with you? 

A:  Humm….. Okay this may be cheating a bit but …a Bible, a hammock, pens and paper, magically transported cappuccinos from Frothy Monkey.

 

The best way to get to know Lynne is to meet her in person! Come by the Foundation offices on Second Avenue North, or email her here.

 


2014 Ball King & Queen Named, Menu and Band Details Announced

2014 Heritage Ball King and Queen
2014 Heritage Ball King and Queen

Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event is rapidly approaching, and officials from the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County are making final preparations for the nearly sold-out 41st Annual Heritage Ball on Saturday, Sept. 20 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

At last week’s Sponsors Party at the beautifully restored antebellum Jasmine Grove home of Lucibeth and Brian Mayberry, organizers surprised downtown Franklin residents Greg Flittner and Nancy Smith with a special honor: the pair was named King and Queen of the Ball, respectively.

“Greg and Nancy have been tireless supporters of the Heritage Foundation, having chaired events and volunteered in myriad ways,” said Torrey Barnhill, Heritage Ball coordinator. “Our Board, staff and Ball committee is proud to recognize them for all they’ve done to advance our mission of protecting and preserving the places that matter in Williamson County.”

Flittner, who now serves as president of the Downtown Neighborhood Association, spent 23 years in healthcare with General Electric and is currently vice president of development for CDI, with an office in Franklin’s downtown historic district. Nancy, who is president of the Brownstones Homeowners Association board of directors, has been heavily involved in assembling a record-setting silent auction offering for this year’s Heritage Ball.

“We feel like we owe it to the community to give our time and try to make it even better,” Smith said. “It has been our honor to be able to get involved with the Heritage Foundation and work with their tremendous staff. Being in a leadership role on the silent auction committee has allowed us to meet so many great people and make lasting friendships.”

The silent auction includes more than 150 items collectively representing approximately $100,000 in retail value. Items range from artwork to luxurious vacation packages, one-of-a-kind jewelry to tickets and rare experiences donated by supporters of the Heritage Foundation. For the first time ever, attendees will be able to bid online using their mobile devices during the event.

Another treat will be the menu, focusing on fresh, local delights from Chef’s Market including a fall salad with apples, Cajun seared pork belly and maple vinaigrette; a New York strip steak loin roulade with mushroom duxelle with spinach, smoked tomato and a Madiera demiglace; and a triple chocolate mousse teardrop cake with Chambord cream and fresh raspberries. Three local farmers – Delvin Farms, Noble Springs Dairy and Allenbrook Farms – have supplied product, and a vegetarian stuffed portabella mushroom option is also available.

Prior to dinner, during the cocktail hour, Williamson County’s Five Points Swing Band will serenade guests with the big band sounds of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Frank Sinatra. Afterward, the dance floor will be packed as Band X from Atlanta keeps the crowd moving until late. Of course, there’s a local connection – Franklin’s own Michelle Froedge is a singer with the dance band that has developed a following all over the South.

Attendees can also enjoy a wine-tasting tent, sponsored by Lipman Brothers & R.S. Lipman, and late-night Southern bites compliments of Puckett’s Trolley.

“There are so many incredible components to this year’s event, including the nod to the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Franklin in 2014,” Barnhill said. “We’ve got some surprises in store, and we’re nearly sold out. We encourage anyone planning to attend to purchase tickets now, before it’s too late.”

To purchase tickets, contact Barnhill at (615) 591-8500 or by email at tbarnhill@historicfranklin.com.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sponsor’s Party Held at Mayberrys’ Magnificent Home; Recognizes 2014 Ball Supporters

Jasmine Grove

Patrons of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County gathered on Sept. 4 to honor the sponsors and table hosts who will make the 41st Annual Heritage Ball possible. The Ball will be held on Saturday, Sept. 20 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin, and will be a retrospective of all that the Foundation has accomplished—with a special spotlight on the Sesquicentennial of the Battle of Franklin.

In its 41st year, the gala is Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event. The Sponsors’ Party, held at the magnificent Jasmine Grove home of Lucibeth and Brian Mayberry in downtown Franklin, recognized the major investments of local and national companies that will further spur historic preservation efforts.

The Ball is honored to have CapWealth Advisors, one of the state’s top wealth management firms, as a 2014 Patrons Sponsor. FirstBank, one of Tennessee’s largest community banks and a relatively new fixture on the downtown Franklin scene thanks to its renovated space at Five Points, is also a Patrons Sponsor for this year’s milestone event. In addition, Premier Sponsors include Alexander Automotive and SouthStar, LLC & Ovation.

“These businesses place a special emphasis on giving back to the community, and that philosophy is also the backbone of the Foundation’s mission,” said Torrey Barnhill, Heritage Ball coordinator. “We look to partner with like-minded leaders who understand the importance of our vision of saving each and every place that matters in Williamson County.”

Barnhill also referenced the Mayberrys’ contributions, and says the young couple is an indicator of both the Ball’s and the Foundation’s multi-generational involvement.

The Mayberrys’ three-story antebellum home, thought to be built around 1850, is the pair’s second downtown Franklin house to renovate in the context of historic preservation. The couple has turned the Civil War-era home—which was in a state of despair when purchased—into a representation of its original grandeur.

Lucibeth says they tapped in to the Foundation’s resources and expertise during the rehabilitation process, and have used the experience to educate their own young children on the importance of preservation.

“Our children are extremely connected to the community because they have a very strong sense of place. The house has given them that connection, even at their age,” Lucibeth says. “We believe we are stewards of this historic home. It’s a wonderful asset to the community, that a family home like this is still serving the purpose for which it was originally built.

“As a family, it’s become our thing together. My 8-year-old loves to give tours. His room’s window has a Civil War-era signature etched in the window.”

As the 80-plus attendees arrived at Jasmine Grove they were treated to bites by Sargent’s Catering and donated spirits from R.S. Lipman & Lipman Bros. The hand of Steve McLellan of Garden Delights crafted the flower arrangements in the sweeping backyard, and Southern Events donated party equipment.

In addition to the Patrons and Premier Sponsors, others include the Major Sponsors: Audi of Nashville, First Farmers and Merchants Bank, First Tennessee, Franklin Synergy Bank, Grand Avenue, Landmark Bank, Lipman Bros. & R.S. Lipman Company, Martin Foundation and Southern Events; as well as the Supporting Sponsors: A. Marshall Family Foods, Full Service Insurance, Inc., Embassy Suites Cool Springs, Stites & Harbison, PLLC, Tennessean/Williamson A.M., Williamson Herald/Southern Exposure Magazine, Westhaven Partners and YOUR Williamson.

For more information on the Ball, or to reserve a $375 ticket to the event, call Torrey Barnhill at 615-591-8500, ext. 20.

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball benefit the work of the Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

2014 Heritage Ball Sponsors

41st Heritage Ball Honors Sesquicentennial with Signature Cocktail

Boneset & SpruceMade From Local Ingredients, “Boneset & Spruce” To Reflect Tennessee’s Civil War Era

Patrons attending the annual Heritage Ball next month will have the chance to sip on a cocktail similar to one generals and soldiers might have made to drink off the battlefield during the Civil War.

The 41st Annual Heritage Ball, to be held Saturday, September 20 at Franklin’s Eastern Flank Battlefield Park, will recognize the 150th Anniversary of the 1864 Battle of Franklin through details ranging from the decor and menu down to the signature libation.

Jon Yeager of PourTaste—who also crafted the GRAY’S on Main cocktail menu—created the signature drink, called the Boneset & Spruce, drawing inspiration from a recipe found in a book called The Young Housekeeper’s Friend, published in 1863 by M.H. Cornelius.

“We’re commemorating the Sesquicentennial of the Battle of Franklin this year, and we wanted that to come through in the cocktail,” said Yeager. “We opened up the vaults and actually went through some recipes those folks would’ve made back then.”

The book contains a traditional drink recipe that calls for spruce and boneset beer, which would often be accompanied by rum or brandy. Yeager’s adaptation is made with molasses, lemon, essence of spruce, boneset root bitters, brandy, rum and mint, and has an almost tea-like quality.

“Every ingredient in this cocktail honors Franklin, honors Tennessee and honors the 150,” said Yeager. “We use brandy because America was actually born off brandy, not whiskey, and the sweetening agent is molasses, which was typical of that era. Mint was also commonly used because we all know in the South mint grows like a weed, so it was something you didn’t have to buy.”

In addition to the Boneset & Spruce, patrons will also be able to choose from a selection of wines and other spirits provided by Lipman Brothers & R.S. Lipman Company.

All proceeds from the 41st Annual Heritage Ball benefit the works of the Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographical and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

For more information on the Ball, go here or call Torrey Barnhill at (615) 591-8500.