2016 Annual Fund Campaign

“Home for the Holidays”

annualfund

The holidays kindle memories of family and our thoughts turn toward home. This year, The Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County celebrates our first Christmas in our forever home. In January, the 1942 doors to the Old, Old Jail were re-opened as The Big House for Historic Preservation. The dilapidated, unloved ruin is revitalized into a vibrant work and community space. It’s not just our home; it’s home for everyone who loves preservation and conservation in Williamson County. Call for a tour. Our home is your home.

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Heritage Ball Casts Old Hollywood, Vintage Vision for 42nd Annual Gala

Now in its 42nd year, the Heritage Ball–the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williams County’s premiere annual fundraiser–is Williamson County’s longest-running black tie benefit and the social event of the season.

This year’s Ball will be held on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 and will cast special spotlight on the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail, the Foundation’s first permanent headquarters and the community’s future Big House for Historic Preservation.

Ball attendees can anticipate an unexpected look to the Heritage Ball, held each year at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

Inspiration for the gala, Design Chair Matt Logan says, originated from the classic 1951 film American in Paris and the classic 1924 George Gershwin song “Rhapsody in Blue,” – cultural bookends to the era of the Old, Old Jail, the beneficiary of 2015 Ball proceeds.

“What I love about historic preservation is that truly everything that is old, is new again,” Logan said. “We wanted to celebrate things past with a contemporary, creative approach.”

Logan, who is the artistic director of the celebrated theatre and production company Studio Tenn, says cool tones will accentuate the setting, with elements of gold throughout to warm the environment. Dark blue tablecloths will be highlighted by art deco-inspired china and set off by brass cutlery.

Blue light cast on the top of the tent, complemented by hung Edison and cafe bulbs, will play off the evening sky to add a whimsical element to the ambiance.

“We took ideas from Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ painting, and the magic of that. You’ll see that the design has a bit of period to it, but with overlying modern touches,” Logan said. “It will be very current.”

Predominantly white flower arrangements–overseen by Steve McLellan of Garden Delights–that include orchids, calla lilies, and roses will form sculptural designs, offering dramatic pockets throughout the Ball.

“Matt, Steve and Cathi [Aycock, Ball Chair] have dreamed up this rich design scheme that feels very Old Hollywood,” said Lynne McAlister, Heritage Ball coordinator. “I can promise that the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball will truly be unlike any other year.”

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball support the non-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

To learn more about the 42nd Annual Heritage Ball, go here. To purchase a ticket, please contact Lynne McAlister at 615-591-8500.

Heritage Ball


The Old Gym Is Getting New Life In An Unexpected Way

A relic of the former Franklin High School–also known as The Old Gym–is getting new life in an unexpected way!

The Heritage Foundation is proud to reveal that another part of “Vintage Franklin” will be incorporated into Old, Old Jail renovations: later this month Rock City Construction Co. will be repurposing the windows from the Old Gym, and placing them at our soon-to-be headquarters.

Located off Columbia Avenue, the building has been standing in horrible disrepair since the fire that destroyed Franklin High School in January 1956. A local nonprofit is prepping to tear down the gym in the coming months, with plan to restore the property as part of the Carter Hill Battlefield Park — but we wanted to be sure to save a part of it, before that happens!

Removing and restoring these windows to use in the Old, Old Jail is not only a continuing of the Heritage Foundation’s commitments to all types of preservation, but it is also a long awaited task that both Mary Pearce and Fred Reynolds of Rock City are excited to accomplish. This feature will not only bring another charming element to the building, but will also encourage that hip, vintage feel that the Foundation is wanting in the future “Big House for Historic Preservation!”

For more information about the Old, Old Jail or the project, call Executive Director Mary Pearce at 615-591-8500.

 

Old, Old Jail
Photo by Franklin Home Page

Under Lock & Key: Old, Old Jail’s Key Club

Ground has been moving at a fast pace at our Old, Old Jail project–and everyone is taking notice! At the Heritage Foundation, we’re getting more and more excited as the days pass… which is why we’re rolling out a new initiative called The Key Club!

Similar to when we sold seats during The Franklin Theatre’s renovation, the organization is providing replicas of a 1940s jail key for those who donate $1,000 to the future “Big House For Historic Preservation.”

In addition to receiving a numbered, one-of-a-kind key–designed by Foundation member Brian Laster–a sign will also be placed at the Old, Old Jail to recognize the Key Club donors.

The $1,000 gift may be paid in installments over two years. To purchase a key and support the Old, Old Jail rehabilitation, call Executive Director Mary Pearce at 615-591-8500 ext. 15 or email Linda Childs here.

When restored, the ca. 1941 Old, Old Jail will act as the Heritage Foundation’s first permanent home and serve as a resource to the community. To learn how, visit the Old, Old Jail webpage here.

Key Club

Take a Seat for the Old, Old Jail!

auction button for chairs

 

AUCTION STARTED: Monday, Nov. 10, 2014
AUCTION ENDS: Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014

Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County Historian Rick Warwick first became interested in local chair makers back in 1971, and has since authored books and hosted dozens of exhibits and presentations on historic Williamson County and Middle Tennessee furniture – hand-made sugar chests, samplers and other local heirlooms among them.

Over the last 40 years, Rick has collected more than 200 chairs, focusing on the locals who made them in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and representative examples of different chair styles from each. Now he’s offered 40 prime pieces from the collection to be auctioned in support of the Heritage Foundation’s campaign to save the Old, Old Jail on Bridge Street in downtown Franklin.

Starting Monday, November 10th, an online auction chaired by Lynne McAlister and Wendy Dunavant will allow the public to bid on the chairs, with some starting as low as $150. An event at FirstBank at Five Points on Thursday, November 20 will include a guided tour of local furniture history with Warwick and other interesting educational elements.

Chairs from the collection are showing up in downtown Franklin storefront windows, and the online auction – including some groups of multiple chairs sold in lots, will start on Monday at http://mobilesmartbid.com/store.php?md=1&username=HeritageFoundationTakeASeat.

You can see a few of these chairs in person by visiting the following downtown Franklin merchants:

  • The Registry – “Dorcas” was created by ex-slave Dick Poyner (1802-1882) at a chair factory on Pinewood Road. It features maple posts and slats, hickory rungs and a hickory seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Lulu – “Bernice” was also crafted by Dick Poyner, this chair features maple posts and slats, hickory rungs and an old cane seat.
  • The Cellar on Main – “Eugenia” is described as a fancy side chair with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs and hickory bark seats woven by Rick Warwick. The maker is unknown.
  • The Heirloom Shop – “Silas” was also made by Dick Poyner. It’s described as a side chair with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs with an elm bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Shoppes on Main – “Lucien” was found in Williamson County and features the initials “NB”. It’s made from hickory posts, slats, rungs and a bark seat. Also featured here is “Effie” which was purchased at the estate sale of Laura May Miller (Mrs. William). It’s described as a Knob Side Chair with maple posts, hickory slats and rungs. The oak seat was woven by Will Poyner.
  • Vue Optique – “Elijah” was crafted by ex-slave Dick Poyner (1802-1882) and features maple posts and slats, hickory rungs, original split seat with original Spanish brown paint.
  • Yarrow Acres – “Enoch Elliott” is a mid-19th century chair that was crafted at the Tennessee State Penitentiary. It includes maple posts and slats, hickory rungs, original paint and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Bob Parks Realty – The “Bedford Brothers” chairs are believed to be from Maury or Marshall County. They are Knob Side chairs with maple posts, hickory slats and rungs with hickory bark seats woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Rare Prints Gallery – The “Thompson Twins” chairs were found in Leiper’s Fork. They are Knob Side chairs with maple posts, hickory slats and rungs and hickory bark seats woven by Rick Warwick.
  • FirstBank – “General Beauregard” was crafted by Robert Parker (1856-1915). It comes from Bakertown, TN in Hickman County. It’s described as an armed rocker with maple posts, arms and slats, hickory rungs and an oak split seat.
  • Landmark Bank – “Josephine” was found in Maury County. The maker is unknown. It is a heart-shaped-slat side chair with maple posts, hickory slats and rungs and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Gallery 202 – “Vestal Coffin” was crafted by ex-slave Dick Poyner. It is an armed rocker with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs, walnut rockers and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Shuff’s Music – “Fannie Mae” was found in Franklin and the maker is unknown. It is described as a triple ring side chair with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs, old green paint and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • The Red House – “Jedediah” was crafted by Dick Poyner at a chair factory on Pinewood Road. It’s an armed rocker with maple posts, arms and slats, hickory rungs, an old finish and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Puckett’s – “Scarlet” was found in the Cool Springs area. It’s described as a knob side chair with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.
  • Bittersweet Primitives – “Hazel” was crafted by George W. Baker (1883-1955) in Kinderhook, Maury County, TN. It’s described as an armed rocker with maple posts and slats, hickory rungs and a hickory bark seat woven by Rick Warwick.

Since 1968, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

Go here to view the auction, which opens on November 10th!

 This classic ladderback chair with original paint and great patina was made by inmates at the Tennessee State Penitentiary in the 1880s.

This classic ladderback chair with original paint and great patina was made by inmates at the Tennessee State Penitentiary in the 1880s.

Old, Old Jail: Becoming a Reality

HF-Old Old Jail Postcard FNL1[2]As many of you know, the Heritage Foundation purchased the “Old, Old Jail” in 2013 and is in the process of restoring the Art Deco-style structure that will soon be our headquarters and the “Big House for Historic Preservation.”

We are thrilled to share the news that the renovation has officially begun on the property! Though the Foundation is nearing its fundraising goal, the organization is still looking for donors who understand the importance of this project: The Big House for Historic Preservation project is expected to cost $2.4 million, and the Foundation has raised approximately $1.5 million to date.

The Old, Old Jail purchase and restoration is broken down as follows:

  • Renovation of the existing building is $1.3 million
  • Additions to the existing building will cost $475,000
  • Installation of parking and event space will cost $325,000
  • Environmental remediation and LEED certification is $100,000
  • Design and consulting costs are $200,000

The vision for the project is to help spark the revitalization of the Bridge Street district, and allow the building to serve as a resource for the community, a place where anyone with a need for or an interest in historic preservation is welcome. If you are interested in helping with the Old, Old Jail project please contact us here.